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  • Originally posted by betadecay View Post

    According to my BC stats, a new album is played quite often in the first 2 weeks. Because it can be found in the news secton of bandcamp or because of the social media, where it is announced (like AO). After that time, it becomes a needle in a haystack. No plays --> no purchase --> no money.

    Making money with music reminds me of the gold rush: the miners did not become rich, but those, who sold the pickaxes, the pans and the dynamite.
    My BC stats support that as well - and great analogy to the gold rush. For me soundcloud is now the place to upload pieces and leave them there for a little while, sometimes only 24hours or so, as a quick place to share something with a specific someone as part of a conversation. Bandcamp is a more permanent repository, and Distrokid is a way to put things out there and get paid (albeit very little)
    SOUNDCLOUD https://soundcloud.com/greghooper
    SPOTIFY https://open.spotify.com/artist/6cbbq2ZO0cjaKXquorwchW

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    • Originally posted by GregH View Post
      For me soundcloud is now the place to upload pieces and leave them there for a little while, sometimes only 24hours or so, as a quick place to share something with a specific someone as part of a conversation. Bandcamp is a more permanent repository, and Distrokid is a way to put things out there and get paid (albeit very little)
      I'd agree with that, SC for me is pretty much entries to the challenges here and odd things I want to share. Having said that, I've been using Hearthis for the entries, nicer player in the forum post. I'd only upload what I consider proper releases to BC, things I want to be considered 'my art', nothing throway.
      Latest release: never to be repeated

      Hearthis | Soundcloud

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      • Originally posted by betadecay View Post

        According to my BC stats, a new album is played quite often in the first 2 weeks. Because it can be found in the news secton of bandcamp or because of the social media, where it is announced (like AO). After that time, it becomes a needle in a haystack. No plays --> no purchase --> no money.

        Making money with music reminds me of the gold rush: the miners did not become rich, but those, who sold the pickaxes, the pans and the dynamite.
        Wise words!
        Yeah, I've noticed a similar behavior on my BC stats too :(

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        • Originally posted by Ambire Seiche View Post
          THE SEX & CASH THEORY: The creative person basically has two kinds of jobs. One is the sexy, creative kind. Second is the kind that pays the bills. Sometimes the task in hand covers both bases, but not often. This tense duality will always play center stage. It will never be transcended.
          Amen to that - while I still strive to be more successful with music, it's the brewing that brings in the paycheck. Thankfully, I like brewing and it is a creative process, which fulfills my creative need as well. Beer definitely has more upside than music, even with the market saturation that's going on right now.
          Home | Bandcamp | Spotify

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          • I'm not making music for the money. Not that there's anything wrong with that. But I don't want to see it as a job. It's a hobby. And as such I like sharing my music for free.

            Maybe at some point I feel like I will have gotten good enough, and would like to make some money with it, so I can dedicate more time to my art. At that point I would probably still have pay-what-you-want downloads, but sell physical media (tapes, CDs, maybe USB sticks) and merchandise (T-shirts, cups, whatever) on the side.
            https://ablaut.bandcamp.com/ | https://hearthis.at/ablaut/ | https://soundcloud.com/ablauto

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            • I can't say I still treat it as a job the last few years, but when I had a truly dedicated space for recording (a small building in my back yard), and had other artists coming to work with me, I did treat it like a job.

              Before each session the studio fridge was stocked, all wires and plugs in working order, plenty of space on the VS880 (with CD and Zip drives), and schedule cleared. If they smoked, several packs of the right cigs, extra guitar strings, batteries, and anything else I could think of to prevent needing to stop the work.

              They usually stayed at the house through a session, and we'd work until the wee hours of the morning, get up and eat breakfast, then hit it again the next day.

              Somewhere I have a time-lapse video of a recording session with a fellow engineer from Orlando (around 2000). It's pretty fun to watch, lots of activity, slowly slows down, lights out, then dawn slowly bleeds in, then tons of activity again. Lots of smoking. I did not run a smoke-free studio, but took apart every piece of gear (synths, recorders, pedals, outboard) once a year, replaced batteries, and cleaned it well.

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