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  • Vinyl Resurgence

    I saw this on the BBC website today. It gave me a warm feeling, a feeling not unlike the sound of vinyl

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-30216638
    Whatsisname's Little Fluffy Clouds | Campsite | Hearthis | Orfium | SeismicTC | Twitter | Ello

  • #2
    That's nice. I too like vinyl and use a working machine, and if I could make all my music using analogue means, I would most definitely do so.
    I wonder how many artists still mix down all their music on tape. Not much point in putting a digital recording on a vinyl.
    https://thegreatschizm.bandcamp.com

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Cloud Hunter View Post
      Not much point in putting a digital recording on a vinyl.
      I have a very relevant question: why not?

      Is there nothing to be gained in playback, or is there some other issue with having a digital recording pressed/cut to vinyl?

      I ask because I've recently been considering making the switch to LP's exclusively. I create most of my work digitally, nothing really sells (I don't really mind,) and I thought it might be cool to just start collecting my own works on vinyl, seeing as I'll be the only person listening to them anyway.

      I can always run my works through an analog filter, like a monotron, for a more "authentic" analog sound, but is there some better way to go about the whole process?
      Last edited by JMPW; 12-04-2014, 06:13 PM.
      https://soundcloud.com/jacobmichaelpeterwelch/on-the-other-side

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      • #4
        I think truly analog albums are a rare thing these days. Often enough the sound will have gone through some kind of digital system on it's way to the finished product. And honestly, if the mastering has been sensitively done, I'm not really sure it matters all that much...

        Releasing your music on vinyl without any buyers to finance it sounds like an expensive hobby but it is a beautiful and tactile format, no doubt about that.
        https://soundcloud.com/westernskiesmotel
        https://westernskiesmotel.bandcamp.com/

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        • #5
          Steve Albini is a famous proponent of all analogue recording, I think there are a number of albums recorded at his Electrical Studios that are all analogue, no digital processing at all (even mastered to two track tape). The Breeders Title TK for instance, they coined the term AllWave to indicate a recording was completely analog.
          Latest release: never to be repeated

          Hearthis | Soundcloud

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          • #6
            Originally posted by regonsch View Post
            Releasing your music on vinyl without any buyers to finance it sounds like an expensive hobby but it is a beautiful and tactile format, no doubt about that.
            I found a guy who lathe-cuts one-offs for $55 shipped (US), per two-side 12" LP, including a full color cover.

            That's actually the only reason I even considered it. Thought it might be something fun to share with family/friends, or enjoy alone during altered states.

            He offers re-mastering services at no additional cost. Haven't made a purchase yet, but will update when I do. I'm not sure about board rules on business, but if you PM me, I'd be glad to share the link.
            https://soundcloud.com/jacobmichaelpeterwelch/on-the-other-side

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JMPW View Post
              Originally posted by Cloud Hunter View Post
              Not much point in putting a digital recording on a vinyl.
              I have a very relevant question: why not?
              I like this question. The more I think about it, the more it bothers me, and that in turn makes me think that Analogue for Analogues' sake is an intriguing conundrum. I have been thinking about this for quite a while now.

              Ones and Zeroes are irrefutable. Haven't we always lived in a digital world?

              Doubt may be a desirable commodity, but as science and knowledge tend towards perfection, Analogue becomes an outcast.

              FWIW, I have a few LP records on vinyl whose digital representations are lamentably insubstantial.

              I'm just trying to start an argument :party:
              Whatsisname's Little Fluffy Clouds | Campsite | Hearthis | Orfium | SeismicTC | Twitter | Ello

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              • #8
                You young punks with your digital domain stuff and you old dinosaurs hanging on to a dead medium.

                Luckily I, both old and wise, yet young and adaptable record only analogly on my pc.

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                • #9
                  The thing about recording purely analogly is that if you want "pro" quality and 16/24 tracks, you will be ruined by the cost of the machinery. Heck, the tapes alone will cost you a minor fortune. For the poor musician with no hopes of generating much sale, 4 tracks analog recordings are certainly an option, either 1/4 inch or cassette. Actually, those limits can cause a real creative boost.

                  Sounds cool with the lathe cutting connection. You might want to check out if the cutting is mono or stereo. I don't think I've come across a stereo lathe but it might be doable?

                  Honestly, I think CDs can sound great with the right mastering. They are obviously not the same work of art as a vinyl and definitely not as sexy
                  https://soundcloud.com/westernskiesmotel
                  https://westernskiesmotel.bandcamp.com/

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                  • #10
                    My point was that all sound is analogue by origin, from the pluck of a guitar string to the chirp of birds. We all hear everything in analogue. Tapes and vinyl are both analogue recording devices, therefore they capture the complete analogue signal. Digital recording, as has been said, works in zeroes and ones; off and on essentially. To create a digital copy of an analogue signal, the ADC (Analogue-Digital Converter) takes snapshots of the sound using the zero-one/off-on configuration. Even if the rate is 25000 snapshots per second, there are still very small parts of the signal that are not captured, therefore the replication is incomplete. Many will never notice a difference, but since I know how this kind of stuff works, this is why I believe analogue sound will always be superior to digital. Therefore, why bother putting a clipped-down digital copy of a sound onto a vinyl when you can have the complete analogue original?

                    Not trying to deter any budding vinyl producers here, just trying to explain my earlier point. Hope that helps folks.
                    https://thegreatschizm.bandcamp.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by aoVI View Post
                      Luckily I, both old and wise, yet young and adaptable record only analogly on my pc.
                      Think I found your next PC in that case...

                      Latest release: never to be repeated

                      Hearthis | Soundcloud

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                      • #12
                        I think we need to be aware that the analogue and vinyl discussions are quite separate.

                        As Cloud Hunter says, sound is analogue and any attempt to capture it digitally won't be 100% accurate. But then again, nor will tape, so many factors in the mics, preamps etc subtly distorting the original sound. It's been argued that beyond a certain sample rate, the human ear is not sensitive enough to hear the shortfalls of digital recording, similar to how 'retina' displays are higher resolution than the eye can distinguish. That's not to say a tape recording can't more pleasing to the ear for 'some reason' but let's not kid ourselves it's because it's a perfectly accurate analogy (source of that word...) of a sound.

                        Vinyl is simply a way of replaying that captured analogue signal and, I must say, I'm not a massive fan. Bear in mind I grew up buying vinyl records (CDs were a year or two away when I started my consumerism) and have owned *thousands* over the years. Yes, they can sound great but no better than a decently mastered digital recording (CD*, FLAC, whatever). I tend towards the kid and the emperors new clothes when people start talking about warmth and soul, I kind of file that away in the same dept as expensive audio cables giving a recording 'air'. Maybe that's what you hear, great, but not me. One mans warmth is another mans mud (I'm the first to admit I don't have golden ears but I wonder how many people do...)

                        * CD mastering: I think a lot of the earlier negative reactions to CD were due to badly mastered CDs. Initially, record companies just used the existing master tapes for the CD releases. These tapes had been mastered with vinyl in mind so had the required bass-cut, treble boost etc. Only later did CD specific masters get made that portrayed the sound as intended. My favourite example is Husker Du's Warehouse:Songs and Stories (yeah, the polar opposite of ambient! ) Vinyl is pretty good, a big brash record anyway. CD is almost unlistenable, fizzy and pretty much bass free.
                        Latest release: never to be repeated

                        Hearthis | Soundcloud

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