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How Did You Discover Ambient?

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  • Sonic Bodhi
    replied
    Originally posted by synkrotron
    Not heard of Aura, Sonic Bodhi

    Looks like a compilation or "best of" album.

    Ah, just looked at his discography.

    The first album I heard of SH was Live Herald which was three sides live and one side studio.

    I then bought his back catalogue including Fish Rising, L, Motivation Radio, Green and Rainbow Dome Musick.

    I did buy Open, too, but by this time I was getting fed up with the new age spiritual stuff which I hadn't really noticed in the earlier albums, although it was there. But Open, for me, pushed that too far over the edge for me and I literally threw that album away and never bothered keeping up with his work after that.
    I'm not religious either, but fortunately for me, I don't let those issues decide for me whether or not I like a piece of music. Unless you ruin a piece with lyrics, that is, proselytising your religion. I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with telling people what you believe, but I do object to having someone else's world view jammed down my throat. This is why I specifically picked all the instrumental stuff of Steve Hillage, and left out all the 'airy-fairy' stuff with words.

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  • synkrotron
    replied
    He was, and may be still is, a great guitarist, and I loved his playing and the whole sound of the band. I think he is still gigging with Miquette Giraudy.

    Used to love some of the Gong stuff to, back in the day.

    Never got to see SH live though.

    Leave a comment:


  • seismic1
    replied
    I first heard Mr. Hillage (L) on "Your Mother Wouldn't Like it" (a Prog-Rock radio show hosted by Nicky Horne on Capital Radio) in '76. I saw him live for the first time at Hyde Park later that year.

    Leave a comment:


  • synkrotron
    replied
    Not heard of Aura, Sonic Bodhi

    Looks like a compilation or "best of" album.

    Ah, just looked at his discography.

    The first album I heard of SH was Live Herald which was three sides live and one side studio.

    I then bought his back catalogue including Fish Rising, L, Motivation Radio, Green and Rainbow Dome Musick.

    I did buy Open, too, but by this time I was getting fed up with the new age spiritual stuff which I hadn't really noticed in the earlier albums, although it was there. But Open, for me, pushed that too far over the edge for me and I literally threw that album away and never bothered keeping up with his work after that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonic Bodhi
    replied
    Originally posted by synkrotron

    I bought that on clear vinyl when it came out in 1979
    I didn't discover it until it was on CD in the 80's but nonetheless.. I was already familiar with Steve Hillage's music from an album I had on vinyl called 'Aura' which included 'The Great Om Riff' and 'Healing Feeling'

    https://www.discogs.com/Steve-Hillag...elease/3801535.

    I still have the vinyl album which I re-bought a few years ago.

    Last edited by Sonic Bodhi; 07-05-2020, 02:28 PM.

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  • synkrotron
    replied
    Originally posted by annode
    Steve Hillage - Rainbow Dome Musick
    I bought that on clear vinyl when it came out in 1979

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  • drling0
    replied
    Originally posted by micheronfire

    I mean, what kind of music marks a similar break with old structures nowadays?
    That is impossible to say. However, one day you will hear something randomly out of nowhere and you will just know. Maybe it follows no tradition you know of, but it just stops you. You just know that this is something special. Perhaps the randomness of discovery adds something special.

    Here is something that happened to me. In 1975 (I think), I went round to my schoolmate Steve’s house and his mum showed me up to his bedroom. He put a record on for me. It was on the Obscure Label so I knew it would be unusual. It was Gavin Bryars “Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet”. And it just stopped me. I had never heard anything like it before. I still cannot tell you what or why it was so special but it still makes me feel like crying, all these years later.

    https://www.discogs.com/Gavin-Bryars...elease/5955236

    I think sometimes random things cross your path. Try to spot them and hang on to them. I try to be careful about analyzing the why and where in case it spoils the magic. That emotional rush is enough for me.

    Enjoy.
    David

    Leave a comment:


  • micheronfire
    replied
    Originally posted by drling0

    It would be easy for me to say that “I had never heard anything like it before” or “It changed me forever” etc.

    However, I think I was always a person who was open to most things from a very early age.

    In 1973, I was 11 years old. I remember listening to John Peel, late at night on my old transistor radio. He was talking about a new album called Tubular Bells.. Somehow, I got the money together and that was the first album I ever bought. I guess as a kid I was just open to a wide variety different stuff. “You never know what you will like until you hear it”.

    I remember when the sequencers came in on side one of Rubycon and thinking that was fantastic. Years later I hear an interview with Edgar Froese where he basically said the equipment was temperamental and early on they did not know what they were doing….but they were the bits that I liked. Those random noises with all of that echo, I loved all of that. Later on, Tangerine Dreams’ tuned guitar solos following a chord pattern were less interesting.

    Later I remember buying “Stratosphere” when it came out. I could play that without headphones in front of my mother. However, I much preferred a double album I had of Alpha Centauri and Atem. Also, I came from the middle of England and I remember that Tangerine Dream played a concert at Coventry Cathedral and they showed it on the BBC. Even though, I read that the music that was broadcast was not the music played live (it was from Richochet), I do remember watching that show and being impressed.

    Here is my advice about listening to any (new) music:

    1 – Give it a try
    2 – If you like it, listen to it again
    3 – If you don’t like it, don’t listen to it again and move on.

    Love as always,

    David
    Thanks for sharing the story. I asked because I can imagine that it must have seemed so radically new, although you were quite young. I mean, what kind of music marks a similar break with old structures nowadays?

    Unfortunately I can't really remember what "shocked" or surprised me similarly, and when I listenened to TD, when I was 14 or so, I of course already had an (unconcious) idea of their style through all the music that was inspired by them that I picked up in the radio, etc.

    annode Ah I recently stumbled upon the works of Steve Hillage, which I approached through sliding into the fabulous world of (Pierre Moerlens) Gong. I listened to Rainbow Dome Musick just once, will give it another try!

    Leave a comment:


  • Damned Robots
    replied
    Has to be Brian Eno - Ambient 1: Music for Airports. I think he was the one who coined the phrase Ambient, although Tangerine Dreams Phaedra album was recorded before Ambient 1.

    Leave a comment:


  • Venkat
    replied
    was starting to make some music and it sounded ambient. My friend said "ethereal and ambient" music is moving and grooving right now. I searched up ambient and drone forums and found this. It is an awesome place!

    Leave a comment:


  • seismic1
    replied
    Originally posted by annode
    drling0 wrote;

    So TD actually did that? Or was it the BBC behind that? This has caught my curiosity.
    EDIT - I see lots of video of TD at Coventry Cathedral at YouTube. Is any of that from the broadcast you saw?
    EDIT2 - This vid's comment sez this;
    The original footage of the 1975 Tangerine Dream gig at the Coventry Cathedral. This is NOT the 2007 DVD where BBC added some extras, but unfortunately also dubbed the Ricochet album over the video. This is an original VHS recording from TV as broadcasted on BBC on 16/10/76, so the quality is not at all brilliant.

    The audio on here is "Ricochet". I have some of the other concerts from this tour, and parts of "Ricochet" are performed at various times, but never in its entirety. Chris Franke stated in an interview I read back in '75 or '76 that Ricochet was assembled from over 40 hours of tapes recorded during the '75 tour.

    Here are a couple of links which help to explain the situation

    Blogger is a blog publishing tool from Google for easily sharing your thoughts with the world. Blogger makes it simple to post text, photos and video onto your personal or team blog.





    Here is a YouTube (audio only) link to part 3 of the Coventry concert, and you can hear parts of the Ricochet set in a different arrangement (and an "alternative" sound quality).



    The entire concert audio from Coventry '75 was available as Tangerine Leaves Vol. 6, and a diligent search of the interwebz will quite probably be successful in locating this.

    Leave a comment:


  • annode
    replied
    Even though I was exposed to and purchased albums like Phaedra (TD) and Another Green World (Eno) I wouldn't say they were my gateway to ambient. Here on the US east coast listening to radio station WXPN in my home town, exposed me to both east and west coast experimental electronics and minimalism. That started 1976 with the show called Star's End.. Before that, WXPN hosted a nightly show called Diaspar which played a variety of new experimental music of all sorts about 1974. I really cut my teeth with that show. But even before that on another Philly station WDAS each (Sunday night)Saturday morn a show called 'My Father's Son' started airing 'underground' eclectic music around 1971 and before that on WMMR the show called 'The Marconi Experiment' started specifically airing 'underground' rock in 1968.

    The underground rock music scene from the 60s brought me from AM top 40 radio into the era of new open minded thinking.I was 12/13 yrs old in 1968. A great year to be moving into puberty. This new expanded mind thinking prepared me for what was to come...alternative styles and electronic music and ambient music.
    Like I was saying before, I got my first taste from FM radio hearing University mainframe computer music composed by professors like Milton Babbit, Charles Dodge, as well as west coast minimalists like Terry Riley(Rainbow in Curved Air), Steve Reich(come out). East coast brought me to Philip Glass and 'Mother Mallards Masterpiece Company'. The UK brought me to of coarse Eno's produced albums like 'The Sinking of the Titanic', Jesus Blood Never Failed me Yet'(B-side) and various other tape looping pieces.

    It wasn't until I went with a friend to see Steve Roach for the first time at the Gatherings that I can say I began actively listening to real ambient styles.One of my first CDs was Robert Rich & Steve Roach - SOMA, and Steve Hillage - Rainbow Dome Musick. Since then I began paying closer attention to ambient. I have always been a listener to Star's End, but didn't really focus on the more ambient artists until later on. My background is in electronics, but I didn't buy my first synth until the late 80s with the Prophet 5 (used).

    So that's about it in a nut shell.

    Leave a comment:


  • annode
    replied
    drling0 wrote;
    ...I remember that Tangerine Dream played a concert at Coventry Cathedral and they showed it on the BBC. Even though, I read that the music that was broadcast was not the music played live (it was from Richochet),...
    So TD actually did that? Or was it the BBC behind that? This has caught my curiosity.
    EDIT - I see lots of video of TD at Coventry Cathedral at YouTube. Is any of that from the broadcast you saw?
    EDIT2 - This vid's comment sez this;
    The original footage of the 1975 Tangerine Dream gig at the Coventry Cathedral. This is NOT the 2007 DVD where BBC added some extras, but unfortunately also dubbed the Ricochet album over the video. This is an original VHS recording from TV as broadcasted on BBC on 16/10/76, so the quality is not at all brilliant.

    Last edited by annode; 05-13-2020, 06:17 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • drling0
    replied
    Originally posted by micheronfire
    What did you think about the music when you first heard TD??

    They also brought me into this territory. I watched a documentary on the german Krautrock scene when they were mentioned. I also liked the ambient corner of the metal sektor and got deeper into this kind of music when I got a tinnitus. Tinnitus nearly gone, love for ambient stronger than ever
    It would be easy for me to say that “I had never heard anything like it before” or “It changed me forever” etc.

    However, I think I was always a person who was open to most things from a very early age.

    In 1973, I was 11 years old. I remember listening to John Peel, late at night on my old transistor radio. He was talking about a new album called Tubular Bells.. Somehow, I got the money together and that was the first album I ever bought. I guess as a kid I was just open to a wide variety different stuff. “You never know what you will like until you hear it”.

    I remember when the sequencers came in on side one of Rubycon and thinking that was fantastic. Years later I hear an interview with Edgar Froese where he basically said the equipment was temperamental and early on they did not know what they were doing….but they were the bits that I liked. Those random noises with all of that echo, I loved all of that. Later on, Tangerine Dreams’ tuned guitar solos following a chord pattern were less interesting.

    Later I remember buying “Stratosphere” when it came out. I could play that without headphones in front of my mother. However, I much preferred a double album I had of Alpha Centauri and Atem. Also, I came from the middle of England and I remember that Tangerine Dream played a concert at Coventry Cathedral and they showed it on the BBC. Even though, I read that the music that was broadcast was not the music played live (it was from Richochet), I do remember watching that show and being impressed.

    Here is my advice about listening to any (new) music:

    1 – Give it a try
    2 – If you like it, listen to it again
    3 – If you don’t like it, don’t listen to it again and move on.

    Love as always,

    David

    Leave a comment:


  • micheronfire
    replied
    What did you think about the music when you first heard TD??

    They also brought me into this territory. I watched a documentary on the german Krautrock scene when they were mentioned. I also liked the ambient corner of the metal sektor and got deeper into this kind of music when I got a tinnitus. Tinnitus nearly gone, love for ambient stronger than ever

    Leave a comment:

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