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How Did You Discover Ambient?

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  • Heaven And Hell
    started a topic How Did You Discover Ambient?

    How Did You Discover Ambient?

    How did you discover Ambient?

    I was on a 3d modeling forum and some of the members were working on an online game called Eve Online. I visited the site and they had all of the game's music available for download.

    It's written by Jón Hallur.

    I listened to his music from the time I discovered it to now.

    I became interested in making Ambient music the moment I heard Jón's music.

  • BassBus
    replied
    I think there’s loads of percussion which could be used in ambient. Janet Gwizdala is preparing an album with a hang drum player. That drum could have a really good ambient flavour to it in the right hands. Steve Lawson has done a lot of ambient flavoured stuff with percussionists over the years. Just released an album with Corey Mwamba on vibes and other similar percussion.

    Leave a comment:


  • ablaut
    replied
    Originally posted by António Duarte View Post
    I think you can find the ambient quality in certain percussive pieces. Take Steve Reich's "Music for 18 musicians", ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXJWO2FQ16c ) for example. Every instrument is played in a percussive framework but the interplay between layers gives it that ambient quality to my ears.
    I totally agree here. I have ideas for doing minimalist pieces for marimba, for example. I think it has great potential for ambient music.

    But, at least for me personally, that ambient contemplative mindspace, which doesn't have a pull towards resolution, is very much harder to get into with a conventional beat. I think in principle it would be possible with something like minimal techno, but that is usually accompanied by an incessant four to the floor beat, which I personally find beyond annoying.

    An example of what I think is good (dark) ambient drumming is https://draugurinn.bandcamp.com/track/ii

    Leave a comment:


  • António Duarte
    replied
    Originally posted by ablaut View Post
    Makes total sense. For me too, ambient is first and foremost about the sonic texture. But I also think it should have a contemplative quality, which is hard to achieve once drums enter the picture (unless it's the more ritualistic, tribal kind).
    I think you can find the ambient quality in certain percussive pieces. Take Steve Reich's "Music for 18 musicians", ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXJWO2FQ16c ) for example. Every instrument is played in a percussive framework but the interplay between layers gives it that ambient quality to my ears. The same could be said about a few minimal techno pieces in the Basic Channel catalog - Vladislav Delay springs to mind.
    To me, the essential quality of 'ambientness' is present when music doesn't move towards resolution. You stop expecting change in the same way you do with other kinds of music. Some people I know find ambient deeply unnerving for the exact same reason that we like it. They will say it's stagnant or static (or some variation of the concept) in an unsettling way. I'm sure you've been through this with people you show ambient music to. I find that very interesting. It's as if the music has to gain your trust for you to let it create this space that you don't know how you're going to get out of. Some people just can't handle that and, in a way, I get it. But that is "ambientness" to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • ablaut
    replied
    Originally posted by António Duarte View Post
    For me, ambient is a quality of music focused on the relationship of vertically stacked layers and no so much on a horizontal progression in time towards a resolution of sorts. Does this make sense to anyone but me?
    Makes total sense. For me too, ambient is first and foremost about the sonic texture. But I also think it should have a contemplative quality, which is hard to achieve once drums enter the picture (unless it's the more ritualistic, tribal kind).

    Leave a comment:


  • António Duarte
    replied
    If I think about it retrospectively, discovering ambient wasn't something that happened in a single moment, since I believe that ambient is more of a quality of certain music than necessarily a genre. Some music's focus on texture made aware of an aesthetic layer in music that is always present but not always valued. While Jesus and Mary Chain's Psychocandy will never qualifiy as canonical ambient music, there is a clear intention there in crafting a notion of space and that was probably the first piece of music that made me aware of that. The trance-inducing repetition of some Velvet Underground songs also opened up a new way to look at and experience music that I wasn't aware of before. When I read my way into searching for Brian Eno's Music for Airports and finally listened to it, I felt like I had arrived at a place I already knew in my mind. It felt more like a legitimization of previous ideas all in one place than a discovery per se.
    For me, ambient is a quality of music focused on the relationship of vertically stacked layers and no so much on a horizontal progression in time towards a resolution of sorts. Does this make sense to anyone but me?

    Leave a comment:


  • jcar
    replied
    Years ago, I lived in Arizona and I worked for a summer at a lodge in the middle of nowhere near Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Before I left for Wyoming, a friend had given me a copy of Aphex Twin Selected Ambient Works Volume 2.

    I lived in a dorm and I had a roommate. I went river rafting, rode trail horses, went on hikes, watched storms crawl through the mountains on their way toward us.

    I listened to Aphex Twin on headphones for hours a night while reading Anne Rice's The Witching Hour over a few months during my time there.

    Whenever I think about one, I always think about the other and where I was.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonic Bodhi
    replied
    Originally posted by john k-n View Post
    I'd like to thank the Golden Globes and the lovely Cleavage between for the "totally hijacking a perfectly good thread with something silly" award. Thank you, thank you very much.

    You like me - you really really like me!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonic Bodhi
    replied
    And so, the sand worm turns...

    Leave a comment:


  • aoVI
    replied
    You guys must have liked Dune Al-lat, but with any puns, a little adab will do ya.

    Leave a comment:


  • windspace
    replied
    Well, Atreides but I got nowhere...

    Leave a comment:


  • synkrotron
    replied
    Nice one GaryG

    For anyone that might not be following the current thread, here is something that might help:-

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Dune_characters

    Leave a comment:


  • GaryG
    replied
    Back on topic guys, you've been harkonnen about this for ages.





    ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • aoVI
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonic Bodhi View Post

    'Yueh' got that right!
    After spinning wheels in my brain for a few minutes and getting nowhere, I concede to your puntasticness.

    Leave a comment:


  • john k-n
    replied
    I'd like to thank the Golden Globes and the lovely Cleavage between for the "totally hijacking a perfectly good thread with something silly" award. Thank you, thank you very much.

    You like me - you really really like me!

    Leave a comment:

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