Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Very Quiet Long Fade-In Intros ... Why?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Very Quiet Long Fade-In Intros ... Why?

    One thing I've noticed with a lot of ambient work here is very long and quiet fade-in intros, that make me wonder if the track is actually playing or if there's actually any audio there at all.
    I mean, I totally understand fade-ins, but why make them so long and incredibly quiet. You want to grab the listener pretty early to keep them going, and such long intros most often turn me off and make me skip ahead in the track, or just stop listening altogether depending upon my patience level that day.
    I also notice that the more widely-listened to "professional" ambient music doesn't follow this trend.
    Personally, I think these long, quiet intros keep people from listening. But maybe that's just me and other people are really into that. <shrug>
    Just some thoughts on the matter.
    Voxonitus on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/voxonitus
    Voxonitus on Bandcamp: https://voxonitus.bandcamp.com/
    Voxonitus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Voxonitus

  • #2
    well I guess there are a range of ambient approaches - ranging from "you shouldnt even notice this is on" to a more traditional "this is a piece of music with a beginning and end". A slow build lets the music move from being outside the listeners attention to gradually drawing the attention of the listener without necessarily specifying the point at which awareness of the music should begin. It might even be the case that one only wants the listener to become aware that there was music when they realise the music has stopped.
    SOUNDCLOUD https://soundcloud.com/greghooper
    SPOTIFY https://open.spotify.com/artist/6cbbq2ZO0cjaKXquorwchW

    Comment


    • #3
      Fair nuf. That makes sense and I hadn't thought of it that way. :D
      Voxonitus on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/voxonitus
      Voxonitus on Bandcamp: https://voxonitus.bandcamp.com/
      Voxonitus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Voxonitus

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree when I'm listening to soundcloud or something (ie. in a 'entertain me!' kind of mode) that a long period of near silence can be distracting almost.

        But if a piece needs it then fine, I guess I'm thinking here of classical pieces that have extreme dynamics, Goreckis 3rd maybe. Grows from pretty much inaudible to overwhelming over the course of twenty minutes or so.

        Latest release: never to be repeated

        Hearthis | Soundcloud

        Comment


        • #5
          That's why I start every song off with a bang. Cymbal crash, gun shot, dynamite explosion, horse neighing, muppets going WAKA WAKA WAKA, Tarzan yells, etc...

          I like fade ins. I like songs that hit a note right away and set the tone. What works for the song is what's good.

          However, I know from doing premieres of new albums with different dj's over the years - really long fade ins are generally bad because it's "dead air". So on premieres we'd often trim the fade ins / outs to be more radio friendly.

          However, sitting - listening on headphones - hearing that audio just tickle at your senses vaguely until it starts to come through more concrete - that can be cool!

          owner / artist
          relaxed machinery - organic .: ambient :. techno
          http://relaxedmachinery.com
          open creative community: https://ello.co/elloambient

          Comment


          • #6
            As an aside, I don't like fade-ins on 'rock/pop' stuff, Radiohead's Black Star for example. Can't say why really, just annoys me, lazy maybe?
            Latest release: never to be repeated

            Hearthis | Soundcloud

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by GaryG View Post
              As an aside, I don't like fade-ins on 'rock/pop' stuff, Radiohead's Black Star for example. Can't say why really, just annoys me, lazy maybe?
              Sometimes I feel same what on rock song fade-outs. But they do them so often it's a like a monument to awesome when someone puts a good ending on a song.
              owner / artist
              relaxed machinery - organic .: ambient :. techno
              http://relaxedmachinery.com
              open creative community: https://ello.co/elloambient

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by john k-n View Post

                Sometimes I feel same what on rock song fade-outs. But they do them so often it's a like a monument to awesome when someone puts a good ending on a song.
                I remember a John Peel session once, I think it was Shadowy Man on a Shadowy Planet, where this whole track was them running through every cliched rock ending in the book. Most amusing.
                Latest release: never to be repeated

                Hearthis | Soundcloud

                Comment


                • #9
                  I find myself guilty of the long fade in. My best guess it that the practice stems from wanting to ease the listener into the landscape, not drop them in like it's Google street view. Also, within the context of an album or other collected work, sometimes the long fade-in may compliment the body.

                  The downside is in the fact that as a composer I am listening intently, and with great focus while mixing or composing, so the long fade in to a landscape I am already familiar with doesn't seem as tedious. This probably won't be the case for a first-time listener, or someone just hearing the single work by itself.

                  The other thing I have trouble editing is the super-long fade-out. I was working on a piece last night and the fade for the majority of the tracks in the piece were over 3 minutes. Way too long. It's like the guest that has said their "goodbyes" and lingers on at the door.

                  When working within any genre, one has to find the proper balance of expected "spices" of the particular genre and going over the edge and ruining the soup with too much salt...

                  or reverb, fade in times, compression, etc.
                  Last edited by aoVI; 07-25-2017, 01:35 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GaryG View Post

                    I remember a John Peel session once, I think it was Shadowy Man on a Shadowy Planet, where this whole track was them running through every cliched rock ending in the book. Most amusing.
                    lol!

                    Reminds me of a story (but then again, what doesn't?).

                    In my old band days we would sometimes have "Last Note Fights" in which we'd battle to add cliche' ending after cliche' ending until everyone else just gave up. I always thought the drummer had the advantage.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I often use the 'fade-in' as well, but I work to try to make it not super-long so the listener falls asleep waiting for the music to become audible- no more than about ten seconds is the rule for me...
                      Ambient sounds like wind or rain or whatever can be good on the intro as well, it gives the listener the 'heads-up' that something is going on and will be followed up shortly with the music, or experimental journey, or whatever.
                      "All we have to do is decide what to do with the time that is given to us" - Gandalf, Lord Of The Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I plead guilty without feeling guilty.
                        | Bandcamp | Hearthis | website |


                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fade in and out in ambient music and related quiet type music makes total sense. I can't argue against it. I like aoVI 's comment on easing them into the soundscape and not dropping them in like google street view. (wonderful visual!)
                          owner / artist
                          relaxed machinery - organic .: ambient :. techno
                          http://relaxedmachinery.com
                          open creative community: https://ello.co/elloambient

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GaryG View Post
                            As an aside, I don't like fade-ins on 'rock/pop' stuff, Radiohead's Black Star for example. Can't say why really, just annoys me, lazy maybe?
                            Totally agree with this. And for a time, I would always try to create stuff myself without "contrived" volume fades and simply let an effect tail finish a piece.

                            But since getting more an more into the ambient creative process I find that I am also doing more and more fade ins/outs. Not as long as some, perhaps, but they are there...
                            Bandcamp // SoundCloud // YouTube

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here's a pretty extreme 'fade-in'...it's about a 9 minute build up drone. Well worth listening to though. (How come I never heard of Eliane Radigue before last night though?!?!)
                               
                              Nothing is a mistake. There’s no win and no fail, there’s only make.— John Cage
                              Hear some of my music at hearthis , Soundcloud, Bandcamp, or just say Ello! Also see H.P. Dronecraft collab with ontol.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X