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Question about recording guitar (direct input).

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  • whispersinspace
    replied
    As IAINX iainx notes, the OP was from 4 years ago. Can't imagine a "...guitar going straight into the instrument pre-amp". Seems standard procedure is using an interface of some sort. I use a Steinberg UR-22: reasonable price, a lot of functionality, dead simple.
    But I noticed on Stupid Deal Of The Day this inexpensive interface (which I've never seen before) from Fender.

    http://www.musiciansfriend.com/stupi...=2069923_26359

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  • magnesson
    replied
    ground loops are the worst! interesting link. i have a fuzz pedal death by audio "sound wave breakdown" that goes APE SH#@! when not strumming or picking strings, run that through my death by audio "total sonic annihilation" along with a delay on the verge of self oscillation and we got a party going on!

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  • iainx
    replied
    The guy I'm performing with in a few weeks has an album of "digital feedback" - no source material, just a lot of effect plugins being fed back into themselves. https://joelmcmordie.bandcamp.com/al...gital-feedback

    Completely off topic to the original post though, but it was from 4 years ago so I guess it's been fixed by now?
    I find energy saving light bulbs to be the most common source of buzz in my guitar, so generally I end up recording in the dark/by monitor light

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  • magnesson
    replied
    feedback through a rotary speaker simulator and then through some envelop filters sounds fun!

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  • GaryG
    replied
    We should do it.

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  • magnesson
    replied
    21 century feedback sounds like it would be a good compilation

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  • GaryG
    replied
    That sounds like classic ground hum, I'd agree separate outlets are best (assuming they're on different circuits) or else a Di between fx and computer with a ground lift. Not sure why the OPs noise was 5khz though? That sounds like the noise i get when my single coils get too near my laptop. Yes, I have recorded it with a view to making a piece out of it. 21st century feedback i guess.

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  • magnesson
    replied
    i have noticed when you use power supplies for computer and effects on the same outlet or circuit you will gain a 60 HTZ hum. so it is best to use separate power outlet for recording preferably a outlet that has no one electronic devices connected.

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  • des
    replied
    You didn't mention the type of computer...laptop or desktop. If its a laptop the problem could be the power supply. A lot of laptop power supplies put noise onto the ground buss which gets into everything. Best way to find out is to disconnect it and try running on batteries. If it goes away you have your culprit. Fixing it would require replacing the offending power supply or plugging it into an isolator and plug that into the power strip/wall outlet.

    If a desktop computer you can try using an isolator to see if thats the problem, but most desktop computer power supplies have tighter regulations preventing them from 'polluting' the local power.

    The problem could also be something plugged into the wall...neon or fluorescent lighting, etc...

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  • Wax Moon
    replied
    Thanks for the suggestions, I've had the same problem with other guitars. Changing outlets seems to change the problem, but not solve it. That might just be in my head though. I'll try out a DI box and report back.

    Also, I'm renting, so definitely not going to hire an electrician.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thought Experiment
    replied
    M-Audio stuff is pretty good so that probably rules out the soundcard. This might sound obvious but have you tried another guitar? Sometimes the grounding wire can break loose from wherever it's soldered (usually the bridge or tailstop). If it isn't the guitar then I'm afraid it's most likely a ground loop, as GaryG suggested. The good thing is your audio interface is equipped with XLR inputs so you could try out the DI box with a ground lift switch as suggested by aoVI ;)

    You could also try different power outlets just in case they're on a separate circuit and therefore not on the 'loop'.
    Any other cures for fixing ground loops usually entail hiring an electrician and can become so expensive that it's cheaper to move house :eek:

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  • Wax Moon
    replied
    I'm using an M-Audio Fasttrack Ultra, which claims to have decent preamps (I'm not so sure).

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  • Thought Experiment
    replied
    Just to be clear - what soundcard are you using? Is it the one that came with the PC? If so, the 'instrument' input is highly unlikely to be a preamp, and you're not getting a strong enough input level. Look into getting a decent external audio interface. Also be aware if you try out the DI box route, you'll need a balanced input on your soundcard interface (i.e. an XLR-type input).

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  • aoVI
    replied
    A DI box with a ground lift switch will help on a ground loop problem. You can find ok ones fairly cheap.

    Guitar center

    Sweetwater

    Musician's Friend

    Amazon

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  • Wax Moon
    replied
    It's possible. My monitors used to pick up the local Christian radio station, so that's probably related. I'm on a desktop though, so I can't unplug. :/

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