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  • Basic EQ settings

    A lot of you guys may already know this, but it is still new and exciting to me to hear how much clearer a track sounds when I include this as part of my mastering (and I am still mastering the technique of mastering hehe).

    PEQ.jpg

    HIGH PASS to cut everything below (at least) 30-40hz.
    LOW PASS to cut everything above 18-19khz.
    And for everything that is NOT bass I increase the HIGH PASS threshold: to 60+hz if it's a kick; and ever higher the higher the instrument is (high strings, bass-less percussion etc.)

    So basically, I put this EQ setting on EVERY channel so you can vary it for each instrument, AND on the master.

    This basic technique is apparently common knowledge among producers. Yet, in all my researching, I have only read about it in the last couple of months. I have used the technique in freshening up my track Embrace & Free, and it is amazing how much clearer it makes everything - everything stands out much more now in a fresh balanced way, rather than everything being all mud-ified by everything else and overloaded.

    I have known of the term "muddy" for years, but never knew what it referred to and how to avoid it, even though I knew there was SOMETHING wrong with my productions, I could not put my finger on it. Research pays off. Understanding frequencies much better now, and how to work each instrument around each other via their frequencies; using the FREE Seven Phases Spectrum Analyzer; and sidechain compression. Primarily it is to assist me with match-making my kick and basslines to make sure they make love, and not distorted muddiness. But it makes the general "sound stage" cleaner. Subtle reverbs are more present, subtle background percussions/fx are more noticeable.

    The Seven Phases Spectrum Analyzer


    Cheers,
    Rik
    Last edited by RikkiSho; 02-03-2014, 04:44 PM.

  • #2
    One reason I love Studio One Pro so much is Project Mode. Being able to toss a multiband eq and compressor over the track and see it visually with two spectrum analyzers (frequency and aural field) has helped me a lot. A better mix to start from helps, too, of course. I prefer Live for the writing, but S1 works so much better for me when it comes time for the technical stuff.
    Meh.

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    • #3
      Aural field??

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RikkiSho View Post
        Aural field??
        sorry, the phase meter >.>



        http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/apr0...emystified.htm
        Meh.

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        • #5
          Ah yeah! FL has one of those... no idea how to read it though...tips please?

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          • #6
            It's primarily for recording/mic'ing, but I use it when I'm on headphones to get a better idea of how the stereo spectrum is looking.
            Meh.

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            • #7
              Panorama you mean?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RikkiSho View Post
                Panorama you mean?
                It dawned on me I didn't really answer you lol and just said what I use it for.

                On S1's phase meter, L/R is obvious (follow their lines, not the S axis), M/S represent the mid/side band (and M is Mono, S is phase). the blue bar on the bottom correlates an average: +1 = mono signal, -1 = reversed phase mono, 0 is true stereo or dual monos.

                It took me a while to wrap my head around it.
                Meh.

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                • #9
                  I use the T-Racks metering for this, either within T-Racks as a built-in, or I can load the metering into EnergyXT as a VST.
                  Whatsisname's Little Fluffy Clouds | Campsite | Hearthis | Orfium | SeismicTC | Twitter | Ello

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                  • #10
                    I love project mode in S1 as well. Nice and neat.

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                    • #11
                      This explains it pretty well.

                      Tighten the low end of your mix

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