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drums in ambient music

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  • Spectrum
    replied
    YnotB
    Well said!!
    Short to and to the point!!

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  • micheronfire
    replied
    I think it can be a nice addition. Some shaman drums or similar stuff... Ever listenend to Ulf Söderberg's Tribal Ambient works? I think he's blending them in quite well. However, I think drums as in drum set can be hard to include. Cymbals can make nice sounds though, but for me, the free floating character of Ambient can get lost with a steady beat. Still it would be nice to see some examples where this has been done in an interesting and holistic way!

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  • YnotB
    replied
    Originally posted by Codehead View Post

    Those labels are fluid and can differ greatly over time, geography and sub-culture. Ambient to some could be downtempo post techno, while other hardliners might limit the genre to soundscapes. In the end, each person will affix their own label.
    You make a very good point - culturally specific. And, some post-techno is very ambient-like, imho. Grey boundaries, I suspect

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  • YnotB
    replied
    Originally posted by ablaut View Post

    yes, do what you want, of course!

    but, applying genre labels is helpful for your audience. that way fans of certain genres can discover your music.
    Yes, I quite agree - helpful, no doubt!

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  • Codehead
    replied
    Originally posted by ablaut View Post

    yes, do what you want, of course!

    but, applying genre labels is helpful for your audience. that way fans of certain genres can discover your music.
    Those labels are fluid and can differ greatly over time, geography and sub-culture. Ambient to some could be downtempo post techno, while other hardliners might limit the genre to soundscapes. In the end, each person will affix their own label.

    Leave a comment:


  • ablaut
    replied
    Originally posted by YnotB View Post
    I'm inclined to think you can do whatever you want. Music genres are all human constructs. There aren't really any rules.
    yes, do what you want, of course!

    but, applying genre labels is helpful for your audience. that way fans of certain genres can discover your music.

    Leave a comment:


  • crepuscular
    replied
    Sometimes when any percussion / drum appears with a clear , steady, rhythmic figure, the music get the "atmospheric" label dismissing the "ambient" label.....
    think on every post-everything subgenre that comes from "rock" music or ambient dub , ambient techno, postindustrial ambient of every kind.. by thinking deep you realize its pure nonsense , but its funny.
    But I dont like when the "ambient" word its used to describe music with actually in your face drum / beats / whatever percussion. Its like saying "drone" metal related to bands with regular volume drums.
    Or bands that plays instrumental guitar music with a strong drum presence. In my books thats not ambient Its atmospheric or just "non ambient" in lack of a better word.
    LOL:

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  • YnotB
    replied
    I'm inclined to think you can do whatever you want. Music genres are all human constructs. There aren't really any rules.

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  • Aïma Dust
    replied
    Drums in ambient ? it's too easy to make a track ;) In my mind (for me) it is very much harder too create a deep ambient track without any drum or percussion.

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  • Brugd
    replied
    I've been listened a lot to ambient techno and ambient dub techno.
    I know ambient techno is kind of an oxymoron but when it's done good it could be fantastic.
    Wolfgang Voigts GAS-project is one of my absolute favorite and when I started to do ambient this was always what I aimed at. Unfortunately I wasn't that good at that kind of style myself.

    Nowadays i often use drums sent trough granular synthesis to make some glitches and strange texture sounds.

    I have an idea that I will make some kind of ambient dub techno album in the future, but the Brugd-project isn't there yet. First I have to do more things that is more like my debut album (as Brugd) and after that it maybe could evolve into that area of sound later on.
    Well, only the future can tell...

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  • Jan Roos
    replied
    Subtle percussion/drums; no problem. More intense percussion/drums; not ambient any more. No problem either.

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  • Spectrum
    replied
    Thanks for the links..Will check out Loscil too as sounds like what I was trying to explain.

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  • dreamware
    replied
    You can definitely use a good 4/4 kick as the pulse of your ambient piece. Rafael Anton Irisarri and Wolfgang Voigt are masters at this. See:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6be18GacTs and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9JgW04g3c4

    Loscil is another favorite of mine. A lot of his work, while not using drums in a traditional sense, is driven by very interesting rhythmic textures and loops. Makes sense as he is a former drummer turned ambient producer.
    Last edited by dreamware; 04-17-2018, 12:17 AM.

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  • Spectrum
    replied
    Hey Ahornberg. Extremely late to the party but thought I would comment incase anyone stumbles on this as is a great topic.

    If you are using drums to create an ambient 'percussive' element or soundscape then why not if it fits in to the project or track you are creating. I do. I had two drum loops that I played around with. Got one to sound like a heart beat and the other like a giant breathe that I looped together in one of my tracks. Don't let the lack of harmonics or melodies deter you...that's what pads synths are chords are for. Experimentation is the key as this leads to discovery. Have fun with the drums!!

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  • studio13
    replied
    The early Ambient productions were often produced by Progressive Rockers - Brian Eno, Youth, Ben Watkins, Steve Hillage and many more. Many of their albums contain beatless soundscapes beside pure rock songs and compromises of both. Some songs have a beat, others not. And sometimes, there are also single songs with rhythmic parts and pure soundscapes in other parts.

    If you listen to The Orb or Future Sound of London, their productions are less Progressive-Rock influenced but regarding the beats, the situation is the same: Their albums are partially beatless.

    In my opinion, a well done interaction of rhythmic and beatless parts is an aspect of Ambient music. Drums may be used but shouldn't always.

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