Gear 300x100
Music Software Bundles from Pluginboutique.com

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to synthesize drones?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I'm getting some lovely drones out of the Volca Modular, thickened up too, very nice.
    It's all an illusion.

    https://soundcloud.com/skyhighdiamonds

    Comment


    • #17
      layers, eq, monoing the low end, avoid frecuencies clashes, be VERY ascetic with efxs, specially the modulations ones, automatize everything you can to give it movement., to insuflate life to your litlle beast till its done.
      work in mono, as always. listen in stereo, re-listen in mono. make adjusts. twist those parameters. re-listen.
      to the ears must sound simple, this is the result of a well executed hard work.
      listeners doesnt need to known all the struggle behind when they listen, they just need to feel it. So keep it transparent, straight to the point.
      dronning its about building, be a sophisticated caveman not a scientific , nor an architect. also dont think with your musical side.
      thats works for me.




      https://soundcloud.com/crepuscular

      Comment


      • #18
        I just cheat and use a modular XD Oscillators in modular land are always outputting sound, so without envelopes and VCAs involved, you get all the droning you can stand

        Comment


        • #19
          For one track I just used an old detuned Zither, played on some strings and slowed it down... But I find it hard to find sounds that resonate long enough while still sounding interesing over time, so I started syntheiszing them with a synth. But then I'm only playing around with all the knobs and hear what sounds good I find it always works with some nature sounds, which I fancy anyway.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by micheronfire View Post
            For one track I just used an old detuned Zither, played on some strings and slowed it down... But I find it hard to find sounds that resonate long enough while still sounding interesing over time, so I started syntheiszing them with a synth. But then I'm only playing around with all the knobs and hear what sounds good I find it always works with some nature sounds, which I fancy anyway.
            You can use reverb or delay feedback to get huge sustaining sounds, but the trick is you need to have your feedback loop connected to a limiter so you don't start clipping. Be careful with this one, because if it's not set up right it can produce some nasty sounds that get exponentially louder! If you've never done this before, do not start sending the effect back into itself until you are sure your limiter will stop the feedback from damaging your ears and equipment. You want a true brick wall limiter that's setup to stop peaks as a starting point: mastering settings that are gentle and designed to preserve peak dynamics might not be adequate to prevent clipping, so again: be careful!

            The cool part about this trick is that you can use any sound source to generate the feedback loop, and even get a few things going at once, and it all washes together and blends smoothly. You can also use extreme settings that you might not otherwise use, since they're being used to shape the tone color. You could set up a whole mixer full of sounds, and just jam out and blend them into the feedback loop, and even have a mic on one channel to introduce words, breath noise, a nearby fan or appliance, or birds chirping outside. The Access Virus TI has effects that are set up perfectly for this, and they have tons of parameters that you can tweak to prevent things from getting dull; and it goes without saying that you can apply any filters with mod sources, gating, auto-panning / stereo effects to it after you have your basic feedback loop.

            One thing I will mention is that it will probably be easier to control things like excessive low frequencies before the signal foes into the feedback loop, so you might want to explore the options on the reverb or delay, or get some filters or EQ set up on your sound sources, or in the channels sending signals to the effects processor.

            I've used a DBX Quantum and the Virus TI for this, but I imagine you could use free plugins too if you want, it just might take some tweaking if you're in the box. Apologies if this method has been mentioned before and is old news!

            Comment


            • #21
              Ok, so after posting this, I decided to use the feedback technique to create a song!

              The song is essentially 3 layers woven together. The first layer is a standard drone on the Juno-60, the second is an arpeggio on the SH-101, and third is a chord from the Juno-60 that blips in and out. It's a darker, beatless space style track insipred by Jupiter's moon Europa, called Linea-x. Also inspired by the Instinct SETI project, and the Lustmord one-off Arecibo, and the Alpha Wave Movement album Harmonic Currents.

              Check it our here : https://subliminalsea.wordpress.com/...n-inside-look/
              There are lots of pictures and in depth descriptions of how each layer is set up, as well as what was done to create the track. It's all done with hardware!

              Here's a direct link to the track itself: https://soundcloud.com/user-175572934/linea-xwav

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Koldunya View Post
                I just cheat and use a modular XD Oscillators in modular land are always outputting sound, so without envelopes and VCAs involved, you get all the droning you can stand
                this is what i do as well, using vcv rack. take a couple of oscillators, filter them, add some processing, lots of modulation. hours of fun!

                and if you're in quarantine, this is a good time to download this free software and experiment with it!
                https://ablaut.bandcamp.com/ | https://soundcloud.com/ablaut

                Comment


                • #23
                  There are so many ways to approach this. And the really fun part is coming up with new ways and techniques. More often than not, for me, coming up with great timbres is essential. One way to do this that I often use is with sampler synths (I love Logic Alchemy 2). Find an interesting sound/recording, I often use my own field recordings. Take the playback speed all the way down to zero and start moving the position button, scrolling through the sound, looking for interesting points. Copy the track, then look for other points within the same recording, while trying to have different areas in the frequency spectrum in mind to work towards a full sound/drone in the end. This way you can build up a nice full sound from parts that sound wholesome and connected. This is of course just the timbre, a starting point for the sound design process.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Layering is definately a great way to add depth to a drone sound, or alternatively layering different types of sounds can also 'heighten' the effect of a simple drone. It seems that drone music can be built from both really simple drones, which may be only a sine wave or a filtered resonant sound, then layered with other musical elements that are different to a drone. This can probably work just as well as layering many different frequency elements onto a continuous sound to create one larger continuous sound. I suppose it depends on what you're going for and what style and sub-style!

                    Gotta say also feedback is a facinating method of creating and building a sound, after all it does produce a continuous "repeating" sound, and depending on the FX chain, the sound morphs and changes over time. Feedback works for both continuous sounds and melodies, and even the minor modulation feedback that creates comb filtering can create resonating effects like Ableton's Resonator plug-in. Therefore continuous sounds may also have tuned and melodic components to them. Perhaps this is easy to forget when you start thinking that a drone is just a long note or osc. But drones can contain thousands of frequencies.

                    I also found this facinating to explore and I don't think I've barely scratched the surface, every artist has their own unique technique and style of making these sounds.


                    In this video I used Absynth 5 and focused on building on a single drone sound and by looking at the frequency content. Probably not the most interesting or deep sounds, but nevertheless we achieved something still very detailed. In this vid there's a number of tips that might inspire you, and I did stuff up the feedback at some point so yeah, go easy!




                    Creating a micro-melody resonant sound with high feedback amounts.





                    Radical Realm E.P. Out Now
                    Sound Design & Synthesis Video Channel
                    Ambient Soundscapes ABSYNTH PRESETS

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      There is plenty of methods for creating "drone", long sustained tones or similar timbre...For me is all about building new instrument by creating a patch in NI Absynth for example, by adding two or three oscillators, and modulating them, say I might have two notes (D minor or major or anything else which sounds good to my ears), and changing parameters until it has movement and excitement, so it does create "music". This is being recorded in real time, since I don't rely on MIDI or automation so I have a control of what is going on with sound...other thing for creating massive, even sub bass drones (below 100Hz), is recording a sample in 96Khz, and changing it's sample rate down to, say 48 or 22Khz in Audacity. it also can be done with any sound source with similar results.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X